Social Skills

Comparisons of Social Competence in Young Children With and Without Hearing Loss: A Dynamic Systems Framework (2015)

  • This article talks about...teacher feedback on the social interactions of preschool age children, comparing hearing children with their peers with hearing impairment.
  • This study found...children with hearing impairment show a lower level of social competence, which may be related to language delays in this population.
  • This is important because...early intervention programs are key for success for young children with hearing loss. Exposure to and practice of language are very important.
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Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in Inclusive Educational Settings: A Literature Review on Interactions with Peers (2014)

  • This article talks about...a review of the current research (2000 – 2014) regarding children who are deaf or hard of hearing and how they do in mainstream classroom settings.
  • This study found...one principal factor that affects a child with hearing impairments ability to thrive in a mainstream environment is the hearing peers response to the child.
  • This is important because...teachers can take away from this that children who are different from one another do not naturally build relationships easily. Time and energy needs to be focused not only on the children who are deaf or hard of hearing, but also on their hearing peers in relationship to how they treat one another.
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Muenster Parental Programme empowers parents in communicating with their infant with hearing loss (2013)

  • This article is about...a parent training program offered in Germany that is geared towards parents of babies (under one year old) who recently found out their child has a hearing impairment. It teaches parents how to positively communicate with their young child.
  • This study found...the parents who took the training more often had natural and positive interactions with their baby when videotaped as compared to parents who did not receive the training.
  • This is important because...communication abilities have been seen to directly impact social skills in later years in children’s lives. Starting to intentionally engage children in communication at the youngest age possible will likely benefit their social skills down the line.
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An Observational Study of Social Communication Skills in Eight Preschoolers with and without Hearing Loss during Cooperative Play (2013)

  • This article talks about...the play skills of four preschool children with hearing impairments as compared to typically hearing peers.
  • This study found...children with typical hearing more often initiated verbal communication; however, children with hearing impairments were more likely to participate in taking turns. Overall, the semi natural environments the study set up seemed to encourage interaction between normal hearing preschoolers with their hearing impaired peers.
  • This is important because...parents and teachers can feel encouraged that it is worthwhile putting children with typical hearing together to play with children who have hearing impairments. Each child is unique and should be given lots of opportunities to practice social skills through real play as compared to drill.
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Communication, Academic, and Social Skills of Young Adults with Hearing Loss (2012)

  • This article talks about...a set of questionnaires given to young adults and their parents regarding how they experienced the mainstream classroom growing up with a hearing loss and how life is now.
  • This study found...that children with hearing loss who were integrated into the mainstream classroom are in large part leading typical young adult lives. In many cases they have a supportive group of friends.
  • This is important because...with the support of teachers, school staff and parents it is possible for children with hearing loss to thrive in the mainstream environment.
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Social Outcomes of Students Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing in General Education Classrooms (2011)

  • This article talks about...the social skills outcome for students who are deaf or hard of hearing in general education classrooms across the course of five years.
  • This study found...taking into account both student and teacher feedback, children with hearing loss have similar social skill outcomes as their hearing peers.
  • This is important because...as compared with past studies, these findings indicate that students can succeed in general education classrooms socially, but they need to feel part of the community rather than a mere visitor.
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Social Participation of Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants: A Qualitative Analysis of Parent, Teacher, and Child Interviews (2011)

  • This article talks about...interviews showing parent, teacher, and children’s views of how children with cochlear implants are coping socially and emotionally.
  • This study found...Although a lot of positive feedback was given about their cochlear implants, social participation and socioemotional well-being were seen as a challenge. Social deafness (the fact that it is harder to hear in group setting) was one of the main concerns among the people interviewed.
  • This is important because...Professionals are reminded that it is important to explain to parents of children receiving cochlear implants the difference in hearing ability when in groups of people as compared to one on one situations.
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The Relationship between Language Development and Behaviour Problems in Children with Hearing Loss (2010)

  • This article talks about...a study to see if and why children with hearing loss experience higher rates of behavioral problems.
  • This study found...children with hearing loss do experience higher levels of behavioral problems due in large part to challenges in communication and language development.
  • This is important because...the more opportunities that children are given to learn proper language and communication skills, they will likely lower risk of behavioral problems as the children grow up.
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Psychosocial Development in a Danish Population of Children with Cochlear Implants and Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children (2010)

  • This article talks about...children in Denmark who are either hard of hearing, deaf or with cochlear implants and feedback that teachers and parents gave about their emotional and behavioral health.
  • This study found...ability to communicate, whether verbally or through sign language, was the biggest predictor of emotional and behavioral health (this even takes into account the presence of additional disabilities).
  • This is important because...regardless of degree of hearing loss or cochlear implant status it is extremely important for parents and teachers to give maximum opportunities for children to grow communication skills.
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